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A Sorta Traditional Thai Wedding

Ending up in Thailand, the country we got married in, on the 7th anniversary of when we met, seemed perfectly serendipitous. Especially since we were there to celebrate the wedding of our dear friend Fame to her French partner, Chris.

They’d opted to have a semi-traditional Thai Buddhist ceremony. I say semi-traditional, because the couple are anything, but “run-of-the-mill.”

Fame, was a Thai yoga champion, before she moved to Seoul to open a yoga studio, and Chris, is a French expat who’d been living in Japan for 13 years prior. They’d met on a beach in Thailand 7 years earlier, eventually fallen in love, successfully maintained a long-distance relationship for 6 of those years, and finally moved to Quito, Ecuador together last year for work.

Like I said, they’re anything but boring…and neither was their wedding!

After days of worrying torrential tropical rains, the wedding day blossomed beautifully blue and clear. We began with the colourful Khan Maak Procession, where we followed the Thai dancers and the sound of traditional long drums, to the bride’s “home,” across the hotel’s lawn.

Here, we watched as the groom was blocked by a ribbon held by 2 of Fame’s female friends, a symbolic doorway that needed to be crossed in order to gain access to the bride. How? By proving to her friends and family that he is indeed worthy and financially able to take care of her.

This ceremony was lively and enjoyable, with Fame’s family and friends giving Chris a hard time (all in good fun, of course).

Eventually though, he succeeded and was allowed to pass through the gate, to claim his beautiful bride. From there, we followed the dancing couple across the resort, to a beautiful spot in front of the brilliant, blue sea.

Absolutely stunning background

Absolutely stunning background

Once Fame and Chris had knelt, the Sai Monkhon Ceremony began, with Fame’s father, linking the bride and groom’s heads together using a specially prepared white thread. The 2 separate circles meaningfully indicating that while the couple’s destinies are linked, they are still individuals with unique identities within the marriage.

The Rod Nam Sang or Shell Ceremony which followed was the most emotional part of the wedding, with each of the guests gently pouring holy water from a shell over the hands of the newlyweds. When it was Ball’s (Fame’s brother) turn to give his blessing, the whole wedding (including me) broke down into tears.

We met later on in the evening, for dinner, speeches and the revealing of the extraordinary dessert. Two days in the making and prepared using 35 kilograms of ingredients transported from France, what appeared to be an egg on top of a biscuit, turned out to be a a burst of passionfruit liquid somehow gelled into the shape of an egg yolk, and floating on a cloud of vanilla bean cream.

Those French and their desserts!! πŸ™‚

The dessert that took 2 days to prepare

The dessert that took 2 days to prepare

Congratulations to Chris and Fame! We wish you a joyful, abundant and peaceful marriage that continues to be full of adventure!

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6 Comments Post a comment
  1. Mr Eats World & I were married in Thailand to. In a traditional Lanna Thai ceremony in Chiang Mai. This brought back happy memories. Thanks for sharing πŸ™‚

    November 7, 2013
    • Aww, you got married in Thailand too!!! πŸ™‚ Thailand is just amazing, isn’t it? It doesn’t matter how many times I visit there, I always fall right back in love with the country…and it’s food! πŸ˜‰

      November 8, 2013
  2. Oh my…I seriously just drooled on my laptop! Not just the dessert, but the setting, flowers, colours, vibes and smiles. Simply perfect. Thanks for sharing πŸ™‚

    November 7, 2013
    • It was a seriously beautiful day! And that dessert…I wish I could capture better just how amazing it was. It was such a surprise to bite into the “yolk” and have this flavourful burst of passionfruit explode in the mouth. I’m still wondering how the heck they got it to stay in that shape!!!

      November 8, 2013

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